MIE Concert: Program Order

Editor’s Note:  This is the 5th post in a long series with an inside view of the planning and production for our department’s first-ever intra-departmental MIE Concert!

Dear Performers/Directors/Composers,

Included below is the schedule for Wednesday’s program as we have it for now. We tried our best to accommodate any special requests that we received. Does the timing of this work out for everyone? Please let us know if there is anything that needs to be reconsidered.

Most of the performances are estimated at 10 minutes and I accounted for 2 minutes between pieces for transitions/the unexpected.

Order of Pieces

8-8:10 “The Rainstorm”
Valerie Thompson

8:12-8:22 “Barbara Allen”
1 American Version
2 Indian Raga
Warren Senders

8:24-8:34 “Harmonic Time: The Language of Rhythm and Music”
Jerry Leake

8:36-8:46 “Exploring Meta-Mapping Systems for Music: A Demonstration of CA-cophony”
Paul Burdick

8:48-8:52 “Barbara Allen” (arr. Robert Beaser)
Rob Flax and Devin Ulibarri

8:54-9:04 “The Faraway Nearby”
Nell Shaw-Cohen

9:06-9:16 “Renaissance Suite” (Order/Names of pieces)
Kirie based on “Mad” by Ne-Yo – Lyle Davidson
Domina Gaga – Devin Ulibarri (b. 1984)
Je suis déshéritée – Pierre Cardéac (fl. c.1530-1556)
Kirie from Missa Sine Nomine – Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (c. 1525-1594)

9:18-9:25 “Barbara Allen”
Darrel Whidden and Concert Choir

9:27-9:40 “Inverse Pachelbel”
I. Prelude
II. Inverse
III. Cups
IV. Bop
Larry Scripp and You!

Thank you,
Devin U.

Performance and volunteer opportunities available for the MIE concert

Editor’s Note:  This is the 3nd post in a long series with an inside view of the planning and production for our department’s first-ever intra-departmental MIE Concert!

Hello,

Tomorrow, March 5th from 6-8 we will be rehearsing in SB 300 for the MIE concert. Specifically, we will be looking at Larry’s piece based on the power-song, Pachelbel’s Canon. Please bring your instruments and your voices. We need singers and different instrumentalists, prepared for fun and the unexpected. Please reply and let me know if you are able to make it. Feel free to invite other voices to class as well.

Also, we need ushers! We have a really cool seating plan, but we need two volunteers to do this. Please let me know if this is something that you would like to do. You may be both a performer and an usher at the concert – That is totally okay! We just need someone to stand up and take this important responsibility in order to assure its success.

Thanks!

First Explorations in using ‘Multiple Representations’ at MusicLaunch

The video below shows a peak into one of our first explorations of using ‘Multiple Representations’ to teach musical concepts at the YMCA in Chinatown. The video shows intern, Pui, taking the lead in demonstrating rhythmic concepts, numeric pitch identification and solfege using Lego blocks that we found in the classroom at the YMCA. The students were surprised by this use of the Lego blocks initially, but caught on quickly.

At the beginning of the video is the initial introduction of rhythmic concepts. One sees intern MusicLaunch intern, Pui, pointing to a block and together with intern Devin Ulibarri demonstrating the desired action – in this case, clapping according to the size of the blocks. The clapping patterns were introduced separately (1,2 and 3 beats), but were combined to create an 8 beat pattern consisting of three of the smaller patterns. The students were then asked to manipulate the blocks in order to come up with their own structures. For example at 0’53” in the video, one observes Kayla’s pattern (2+1+3) and then her brother changing the pattern (2+3+1). This moment is important because it empowers the student and demonstrates that musical concepts can be mastered and manipulated – it develops their creativity.

At 4’22” into the video, one can see the culmination of the entire lesson. In this final review, Pui asks students to identify the solfege names of the notes by hinting at the numeric name. Pui asks the class what the second pitch in the scale is to which a student answers, “Re”. Pui then asks the class to answer using pitch to which the class accurately sings the intended pitches that she is identifying using her fingers (numeric name). At the end of the review, Pui tests the students mastery by asking them to skip “Re” and accurately sing “Mi” from “Do” – the students have some difficulty doing this, but this is their first time and subsequent videos will reveal their progress.

The video ends with quick demonstrations of other types of multiple representations that we have used in the break off sections of MusicLaunch. Future blog posts will keep you posted on the significance of these other forms of multiple representations and how they have helped the development of the students in MusicLaunch at the YMCA in Chinatown.

Janea & Jason Play for Each Other

Editor’s Note: This post is the fourteenth in a series by MIE guided intern Devin Ulibarri. Devin is a first year graduate student of Eliot Fisk. His internship at the Wang YMCA is supported both by the MIE department and NEC Prep’s Community Engagement program. Read others in the series here.

Both Janea and Jason have put in good work and displayed performances the reflect their progress!

Jason’s First Rock and Roll Song!

Editor’s Note: This post is the fourteenth in a series by MIE guided intern Devin Ulibarri. Devin is a first year graduate student of Eliot Fisk. His internship at the Wang YMCA is supported both by the MIE department and NEC Prep’s Community Engagement program. Read others in the series here.

“Real learning is a volitional act…”– Eric Booth
Journal for Learning Through Music/Summer 2003

Jason was the first one to learn ‘My First Rock Song’ during one of the weeks that Janea was away (she learned it the following week). I think that the lead in to this piece was a very good example of what Eric Booth is talking about when he says that “learning is a volitional act.” The lesson that day was very spontaneous. Jason asked many questions and I answered them with improvised, musical answers. For example, he mentioned how the thumb seems to attack more comfortable when it is the lower strings and when the motion is opposite to that of the other fingers. This was a very astute observation in itself and I was taken aback by his making it. Then, I decided to keep the momentum going by taking it one step further. I asked myself, “why not learn about the thumb now? He is asking good questions, what can I do with the thumb and open strings?”

So together we played a blues progression in A major, using the open bass strings, E, A and D. He did very well following along and asked, “Is this ‘My First Rock Song?’ I replied that it wasn’t and that we had just made it up together, then he asked me if we could learn ‘My First Rock Song’ today. Again, I decided to go with the momentum that Jason was providing and we learned ‘My First Rock Song’ together. The following week we reviewed and showed Janea how to play and sing the piece.

You Can’t do This With a Pick! – March 5th

Editor’s Note: This post is the twelfth in a series by MIE guided intern Devin Ulibarri. Devin is a first year graduate student of Eliot Fisk. His internship at the Wang YMCA is supported both by the MIE department and NEC Prep’s Community Engagement program. Read others in the series here.


Janea always asks very good questions. Today’s big question was, “why do you play with your fingers?” The simplest answer is that you can’t do what I do with a pick. I hope that my demonstration speaks for itself.

As for strumming – I think that is cool too and there are definitely sounds a pick can make that fingers can’t, but I think that there is a lot more benefit to be had from starting with finger-style, especially in the early stages since the possibilities are almost limitless.

The Ninja and Left Hand Fingers – March 5th, 2011

Editor’s Note: This post is the eleventh in a series by MIE guided intern Devin Ulibarri. Devin is a first year graduate student of Eliot Fisk. His internship at the Wang YMCA is supported both by the MIE department and NEC Prep’s Community Engagement program. Read others in the series here.

What’s up with “The Ninja?” The kids have some good guesses, but the thumb in the left hand is the ninja because it hides. This is an easy and fun way to learn a technique that will help Jason and Janea play with their fingers and produce simultaneous lines. The thumb must be behind the fretboard in order to support and allow the other fingers flexibility. I then take it one step further by challenging them to move up and down the fretboard.